2020 Conference Agenda

Select one of the tabs from the 5 streams below to show the relevant agenda

Retail, Consumer Goods & Packaging

Day1: November 10, 2021

Networking breakfast
8:15 am - 8:55 am (CET)
Opening Plenary and Keynote Session
9:00 am - 12:30 pm (CET)

(CET)

Panel Discussion: Accelerating a circular plastics economy through partnerships
Kristin Hughes
Director of the Global Plastic Action Partnership and Member of the Executive Committee
World Economic Forum
The dramatic increase in global plastic waste and pollution has become one of the greatest environmental crises of our time, with around eight million tons of plastic waste leaking into the ocean every year. By assembling a diverse and influential coalition of allies dedicated to addressing this challenge, the Global Plastic Action Partnership (GPAP) has forged a powerful multi-stakeholder platform to accelerate impact at both the global and national levels. Kristin will reveal more about how GPAP is harnessing the convening power of the World Economic Forum to form impactful partnerships, create alignment among diverse initiatives, and guide an inclusive transition towards a circular economy for plastics.
 

(CET)

European plastic policies: state-of-play
Werner Bosmans
Directorate General Environment
European Commission
Challenges linked to the production, consumption and end-of-life of plastics can be turned into an opportunity for the European Union and the competitiveness of the European industry. Tackling them through an ambitious strategic vision, covering the entire value chain, can spur growth, jobs and innovation. It can also reaffirm European leadership in global solutions and help us make the transition towards a low-carbon and circular economy, while providing citizens with a cleaner, safer environment.
 

(CET)

The Basel Convention Amendment on Plastic Waste and its relevance to industry
Rolph Payet
Secretariat
Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions
During the Basel Conference of the Parties in April/May 2019, governments amended the Basel Convention to include plastic waste in a legally binding framework to make global trade in plastic waste more transparent and better regulated, while also ensuring that its management is safer for human health and the environment. At the same time, a new Partnership on Plastic Waste was established to mobilize business, government, academic and civil society resources, interests and expertise to assist in implementing the new measures, to provide a set of practical supports – including tools, best practices, technical and financial assistance. Dr Payet will reveal the latest in regard to the Basel Convention Plastic Waste Amendments.
 

(CET)

The Current State and Future of Plastic Taxes
Victor Bell
US Managing Director
Lorax EPI
There is a growing movement around the world to tax plastic packaging, whether it be to fill budget gaps left by COVID-19 or to bolster infrastructure for recycling. Plastic taxes have already been passed in many places, including the UK, Italy and the EU, and are being proposed around the globe at national and regional levels. Taxes are based on different policies in each country, such as recycled content or amounts recycled, and can have a major impact on cost of goods for many packaging systems. As part of our presentation, Lorax EPI will give examples of what these taxes may cost brand owners and provide a global update on current statuses of various plastic taxes under development.
 

(CET)

Panel discussion: Taxes, bans and producer responsibility - what is the right policy measure for improving plastic outcomes?
Robbie Staniforth
Head of Policy
Ecosurety
Victor Bell
US Managing Director
Lorax EPI
Berry Wiersum
Head of Regulatory Affairs
Sappi Europe
 
Technologies & Solutions Directly Eliminating Plastic
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm (CET)

(CET)

It’s 2021 and what’s really going on? Joining the plastic dots to accelerate real change
Siân Sutherland
Co-Founder
A Plastic Planet
This presentation she will explore the connection of plastic to the climate crisis with a snapshot of plastic progress, innovations, health science, corporate risk and smokescreens.

(CET)

Smart Design for Sustainable and Circular Solutions
Jonathan Demierre
Team Section Lead - Circular and Sustainable Product Engineering
Helbling
How products and systems are designed is key to address sustainability challenges, such as climate change, plastic waste, loss of biodiversity, or resource depletion. Using life cycle thinking and a holistic approach is key to minimize the environmental impact of the products that we use every day. The design of sustainable products is a multi-criteria and multi-parameter optimization in which many aspects needs to be considered such as the targeted markets and consumers, the manufacturing process, and the product end-of-life. A few practical examples will illustrate how a sustainable and circular design approach can make the difference.

(CET)

eplacing synthetic fibres through open innovation and flexible technology: How we develop functional cellulose fibre solutions for high-performance applications
Ilka Kaczmarek
Innovation Manager
Kelheim Fibres GmbH
Our vision is to use our cellulosic fibres to enable the production of fully biodegradable solutions with performance comparable to products containing synthetic fibres. Fields of applications where the replacement of synthetic fibres can be achieved thanks to our innovative solutions include disposable Hygiene products (Femcare, Adultcare, Babycare, (flushable) wipes), functionalized textiles, reusable Hygiene Products (e.g. period panties).

(CET)

Technological options to make Plastics Circular
Dr Christian Haessler
SVP & Head of Circular Economy Program
Covestro
Christian will give a presentation on technolgical Options to make palstics circular. in thsi respect, the well established way of chemcia Recycling pkays an important role and the Technology Needs to be further developed, including the collecting, sorting and seperating of plastic waste so that the amount of mechnical recycled plastic can be increased.

(CET)

Sustainable Masterbatch Solutions for Plastic Converters
Omri Mazar
Product Manager
Tosaf Group
Tosaf has made it a priority to find more sustainable practices in Plastics Manufacturing. I would like to elaborate on four different segments and present solutions in each of the segments: • Recycle enablers – solutions that ease processing of recycled raw materials and improve it properties and performance. • Recyclable solutions – various high-performance additive and color solutions that do not compromise full recyclability. • Solutions for the biodegradable and bio-compostable polymer systems • Efficiency boosters – indirect solution to reduce overall raw material, energy, time, and labor demand.

(CET)

Panel Discussion: From “Plastic Oceans” to “Plastic Waste Free Oceans” by 2050! How can we get from the old crime story to a new reality?
Henrik Langholf
Zukunftsmoderator/Future Facilitator
Zukunftsmoderation
Marko Kärkkäinen
Chief Commercial Officer - Global
Clewat Inc.
The global movement for a smart use of (no) plastic is one of the most fascinating and successful happenings towards more sustainability. Where ever you go, consumers are reducing their plastic foot print, companies are developing material innovations, communities are optimizing their recycling systems, national and international networks are researching on new standards for the circular economy, governments are setting new frames through objectives and laws.

Day2: November 11, 2021

Multi-faceted Tools for Establishing Plastic's Footprint and Transparency of the Supply Chain
9:00 am - 12:30 pm (CET)

(CET)

Toolbox to evaluate the biodegradation of plastic materials in the open environment
Dr Miriam Weber
Managing director
HYDRA Marine Sciences GmbH
Biodegradable plastic materials are increasingly being discussed as an alternative for conventional non-biodegradable plastic and as a mitigation strategy against plastic pollution, especially for items with an intentional input (e.g. seed coating, etc.), with a high potential of loss (e.g. mulch film, etc.) and where loss is intrinsic to use (e.g. abrasion of aquaculture nets, textiles, tiers, etc.). The question for society is how to deal with biodegradable plastic known to end up in the open environment. We present options for biodegradation testing schemes showing several scenarios. They are based on the delicate balance of either high informative value and decreased costs.
 

(CET)

Giving new life to old mattresses
Lucie Porcelli
Sustainability Leader
Dow Europe GmbH
In Europe each year around 30 million mattresses are discarded and currently most of this bulky waste-stream (~60%) ends up in landfills, the remainder being incinerated to produce heat and electricity. At present, waste-to-energy is the preferred technology for the treatment of end-of-life polyurethane (PU) foam. However, incineration is a source of CO2 and a waste of valuable resources. Recycling PU foams and building a recycling supply chain poses unique challenges. Today, markets for products from mechanical recycling have been developed but are of low-value, while the market size is small and in decline. Therefore, alternative solutions for discarded mattresses, such as, chemical recycling and consequently creating a market for recovered raw materials (polyols) with recycled content, needed to be developed. To address this challenge, the award-winning RENUVA™ Mattress Recycling Program aims to reduce this mountain of waste by giving polyurethane (PU) foam from end-of-life mattresses a new life. The program will take discarded mattress foam and turn it back into raw material (polyols) through chemical recycling, the process of converting waste into feedstock. The new raw material will then be used in flexible or rigid foam products to go into applications such as building insulation boards and even new mattresses. While converting PU foams to polyols is not new, it has never been implemented for post-consumer waste bringing new technology challenges and complexity of collection and dismantling. At Dow, we believe our materials need to be as valuable at the end of their life as they are at the start—and we're addressing the challenge of discarded mattresses head-on. To tackle the problems of mattress waste, we needed to create a way to close the loop on the polyurethane foams they're made with. While converting PU foams to polyols is not new, it has never been implemented for post-consumer waste bringing new technology challenges and complexity of collection and dismantling. For example, in most countries, there is an absence of adequate waste collection facilities that prevents any stable sourcing for chemical recycling. And, the downstream market for such polyols is limited. In order to drive significant market impact, Dow adopted a ‘collaboration approach’ with industry partners across the value chain. From the cooperation in 2017 with equipment producer and processing specialist H&S Anlagentechnik, to selecting the plant operator – Orrion Chemicals Orgaform in May 2020 in France, Dow has been actively seeking out key partnerships to pioneer a model of true circularity for recycled polyols. These efforts were further strengthened by Dow joining forces with French EPR (Extended Producer Responsibility) firm, Eco-mobilier, for supply of polyurethane foam from post-consumer mattresses to the recycling unit. In October 2020, Dow took one step further in this journey by announcing a collaboration with the Vita Group, Europe’s leading flexible polyurethane foam solutions provider, to produce flexible polyurethane (PU) foams made with RENUVA™ polyols. And it is expected that before the Plastic Free World Conference, more collaborations will be announced. We would like to discuss during the next Plastic Free World Conference about HOW Dow and its partners are making mattress recycling a reality. This is not a concept, idea or lab-scale operation. This is a reality. During the talk, we would offer to have a unique look into the plant construction in Semoy, France, which at capacity, will recycle PU foam of up to 200,000 mattresses annually. Unlike the incineration process currently used, the RENUVA™ polyols produced from waste mattresses will have approximately 30% lower carbon footprint compare to a virgin polyol produced, according to a preliminary internal Life Cycle Assessment. As such, landfills are reduced, incineration avoided, the carbon footprint of the industry is improved, and business value is generated. The plant construction is currently underway and is expected to be operational during 2nd half of 2021. And, we consider the RENUVA™ Mattress Recycling Program to just be the beginning. By demonstrating that polyurethanes can be recycled when the right eco-system exists, we hope to stimulate the entire PU industry and create more demand for a process that could then be extended to other markets.
 

(CET)

Digimarc Barcode on plastic packaging solution creates societal value - we have calculated it
Caterina Camerani
Vice President Sustainability
PACCOR Group
The Digimarc Barcode innovation, introduced on the surface of plastic packaging by PACCOR, enables the correct identification of each package throughout the value chain to consumers and disposal companies, allowing for a proper recover of the material.
 

(CET)

Underpinning ESG claims with traceability
Douglas Johnson-Poensgen
Founder & CEO
Circulor
 

(CET)

Moving towards sustainable and transparent supply chains through certification
Hanna Buck
Program Manager & Sustainability Expert
Control Union
Is your business taking responsibility for its plastics impact? Do you have a robust process in place to back up your claims around plastics? With pressure to reduce plastic usage coming from both consumers and governments, a certification against a trusted plastics standard is of great value to businesses. Now more than ever companies need to prove the ways in which they are recycling, cutting the use of plastic and adopting alternative, compostable, materials through a credible certification process. This presentation will give an insight into which plastic-related certifications are available, the benefits of having a certification and basic procedures of certifications to move towards more sustainable and transparent supply chains.
 

(CET)

PANEL DISCUSSION: SEALIVE (Strategies of circular Economy and Advanced bio-based solutions to keep our Lands and seas alIVE from plastics contamination)
Miriam Gallur
Materials and Packaging Area Manager at ITENE
ITENE
Decoupling plastic production from fossil feed-stock and creating a circular plastics economy are essential to achieving European Union climate, energy and sustainability goals. Approximately 12 million tons of plastic waste ends up in our oceans and contaminates our land every year. While there has been a recent shift toward the use of bio-based plastics, these materials have limitations and are not easy to recycle using current technologies. SEALIVE will address all these challenges with a vision to to reduce plastic waste and contamination on land and in seas by boosting the use of biomaterials and contributing to the circular economy with cohesive bio-plastic strategies.
 
End-of-life Options for Plastic and Valorising Waste
1:30 am - 5:00 pm (CET)

(CET)

Innovative financing mechanisms: Plastic credits for inclusive & transparent circularity
Christina Jäger
Co-founder & Managing Director
Yunus Environment Hub
There is a growing movement towards increasing plastic recycling rates, in particular by consumer goods companies who are facing intense pressure to reduce the environmental impact of their waste packaging. A variety of measures are being explored, including reduction of packaging, increasing recycled and recyclable content of packaging, the use of biodegradable material, packaging returning schemes, etc.

(CET)

The Circularity entire circularity solution of PET
Christian Crépet
Executive Director
PETCORE Europe
Presentation Description: 1-PET is safe and sound 2- Refill at home, on the go and through bottle crates recognition within a RDS. 3- Re-use through compaction with RVM ( reverse vending machines) through a RDS. 4- Mechanical Recycling 5- Chemical recycling by depolymerization. 6- CO2 performances.

(CET)

Plastic Bank Recycling Ecosystems, powered by Blockchain
Shaun Frankson
Co-Founder and Chief Technology Officer
Plastic Bank
Plastic Bank® empowers the regenerative society. We are helping the world stop ocean plastic while improving the lives of collector communities. Plastic Bank builds ethical recycling ecosystems in coastal communities and reprocesses the materials for reintroduction into the global manufacturing supply chain. Collectors receive a premium for the materials they collect which helps them provide basic family necessities such as groceries, cooking fuel, school tuition, and health insurance. Plastic Bank’s certified blockchain platform secures the entire transaction and provides real-time data visualization – allowing for transparency, traceability, and rapid scalability. The collected material is reborn as Social Plastic® which can be easily reintegrated into products and packaging as part of a closed-loop supply chain. Plastic Bank currently operates in Haiti, Brazil, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Egypt. The Plastic Bank blockchain platform ensures a complete audit trail of every transaction and exchange - from the initial point of collection through to the reintroduction of Social Plastic® product on the retail shelf. Our proprietary platform secures transactions and provides real-time data visualization - allowing for transparency, traceability, and rapid scalability at every step of the closed-loop supply chain. The Plastic Bank App maintains all operations from a global standpoint. Developed with IBM, the Plastic Bank App utilizes blockchain technology to ensure all plastic is ethically collected, reprocessed by partner processors, and sold to Plastic Bank partner clients. For the collector, the App provides a fair, reliable and transparent payment system while validating the identity of all members. For our partners, the App ensures a complete audit trail of every transaction and exchange - from the initial point of collection through to the reintroduction of Social Plastic® product on the retail shelf. Using the blockchain technology, Plastic Bank offers real-time data visualization and dashboards. With over 100,000 transactions processed, the Plastic Bank App offers access to a secure supply chain of recycled Social Plastic® feedstock, while storing authentic impact data and demonstrating environmental, social, and economic impact for brand partners. Plastic Bank’s breakthrough, closed-loop recycling model allows the company to rapidly scale and enter new geographies. Recycling ecosystems are vertically integrated, ensuring that all stakeholders benefit at every step in the supply value chain. By working with local collection branches and processing partners, Plastic Bank is able to quickly gain the trust of communities and seamlessly establish operations that directly impact the lives of collectors and their families. Plastic Bank collectors receive premiums for the materials they collect. When collectors deposit plastic waste, their digital ID is scanned, Plastic is sorted and weighed by material and colour, and then collectors receive market price for plastic and premiums that are automatically deposited into their digital bank account. This helps over 22,000 collectors worldwide provide basic family necessities such as groceries, cooking fuel, school tuition, and health insurance. The material collected in Plastic Bank’s closed-loop recycling ecosystems are reprocessed and reborn as Social Plastic® to be reintroduced into the supply chain for the creation of new products and packaging materials. Global brand partners including Henkel, SC Johnson, Advansa, Carton Pack, and Hugo Boss. By integrating Social Plastic® back into the supply chain, these brands are building a regenerative plastic economy that is stopping ocean plastic and improving the lives of collector communities. Social Plastic® is regenerating ocean-bound plastic into environmental, social, and economic impact.

(CET)

Plastic waste into pure products - the next generation of chemical recycling
Daria Frączak
R&D Manager
Clariter

(CET)

Increasing the uptake of recycled materials by businesses - A review of barriers, enablers and circular business models
Malou van der Vegt
Researcher and lecturer circular economy
University of Applied Sciences Utrecht
The presentation will cover the various barriers and enablers for recycling (for the total plastic industry and all types of products). The aim is to provide practical insights into the current situation in industry and to provide an overview of the barriers and enablers for the uptake of recycled plastics by businesses and other actors along the value chain. Findings are based on the outcomes from several workshops done in the Netherlands, Germany, of the United Kingdom and Belgium, as part of the Interreg project TRANSFORM-CE. Throughout the presentation, practical examples of circular business models will be given, with lots of inspiration to stimulate the uptake of recycling by businesses. Such examples will have a direct link to the outlined barriers and enablers. In summary, the barriers and enablers for recycling and the practical examples from industry will allow others to determine the steps that are needed to increase the uptake of recycled materials by businesses.

(CET)

Connecting the dots: How Circularity of Plastics will get us to Climate Neutrality
Tara Nitz
Global Positioning & Advocacy Circular Economy
Covestro
The aim to become Fully Circular at Covestro is closely interlinked with the Goal set also by the Paris Agreement, the European Union and in many more jurisdictions to become climate neutral. Circularity is playing an indispensible role to reach this Goal. The more we circulate carbon in products through a Circular Economy, mechanical and chemical Recycling and the use of alternative raw materails instead of fossil raw materials, the more emissions we avoid and by closing the carbon Loop are getting closer to climate neutrality. Making pastics circular reduces not only the Plastics footprint but also the scope 3 footprint of end and consumer products, therby contributing to climate neutrality throughout the value cycle. I will aim to contribute to the discussion by highlighting those connections and the preferred policy options to build a climate-neutral CE for Plastics.

(CET)

Panel Discussion: Innovative financing mechanisms: Plastic credits for inclusive & transparent circularity
Daniela Albuquerque
Marketing Coordinator
BVRio
Christina Jäger
Co-founder & Managing Director
Yunus Environment Hub
There is a growing movement towards increasing plastic recycling rates, in particular by consumer goods companies who are facing intense pressure to reduce the environmental impact of their waste packaging. A variety of measures are being explored, including reduction of packaging, increasing recycled and recyclable content of packaging, the use of biodegradable material, packaging returning schemes, etc.

Food & Beverage

Day1: November 10, 2021

Networking breakfast
9:00 am - 12:30 pm (CET)
Keynote Session

(CET)

Extended producers responsibility for packaging - a plastic perspective on modulated fees
Robbie Staniforth
Head of Policy
Ecosurety
 

(CET)

Using data to accelerate success in a world becoming less reliant on plastics
David Harding-Brown
CEO
EcoVeritas
The world today has a heightened focus on the impact of packaging, particularly plastic packaging, and the need to reduce ocean pollution and promote a circular economy. Our presentation will look at the current legislative landscape, the constantly evolving requirement to meet global legislative obligations across markets and the mitigation of the impact of packaging from a legal, value chain and supply chain perspective​. ecoVeritas has provided businesses with effective solutions along their entire supply chain. This presentation will demonstrate the commercial benefits that collecting and analysing accurate packaging and sustainability data, in line with future legislative requirements, brings to businesses, along with exploring the value of data transparency and optimisation solutions upstream to reduce cost and environmental impact​.
 

(CET)

Presentation title to be announced
Jürgen Dornheim
Director Corporate Packaging Sustainability & Innovation
Procter & Gamble
 

(CET)

The Beauty of Circularity-COTY’s closed-loop cradle-to-cradle transport packaging system
Volker Maier
Global Luxury Engineering Leader and Engineering Director
COTY,
A global beauty company and member of the Ellen MacArthur “Circular Economy 100 Network”,COTY will share their experience with a circular innovation project at their bottling plant in Cologne (Germany), which combines the use of secondary organic feedstock and digital technology within a closed-loop system. Their highly scalable pilot project substantiatesthe business case for a cradle-to-cradle (C2C) approach for industrial transport packaging. It turned out to be an engine for innovation, collaboration, and growth for all partners in the C2C value cycle. In addition to listed benefits backed-up by production data, COTY will illustrate the scaling potential across different supply chains, industries and regions
 

(CET)

Panel Discussion: Collaboration within supply chains
Graeme Smith
Head of Product Sustainability for Flexible Packaging and Engineered Materials
Mondi
 
Elimination of problematic or unnecessary plastic packaging
1:30 am - 5:00 pm

(CET)

How does packaging sustainability influence consumers’ perception of a product, and how can this be positively shaped by involving packaging designers at an early stage?
Claudia Rivinius
Marketing Director
STI Group
Packaging is the first touchpoint for a product and therefore significantly impacts product perception. Participants of this presentation will learn: - which aspects of packaging development to take into account - how packaging can be made more sustainable - what the supply chain considerations are; from cradle to cradle How to sustainably inspire shoppers at the POS? How to make your POS presence more sustainable. How to credibly communicate your ecological commitment at the POS How to set up a display in just a few seconds and save not only time, but also CO2 How Alpro convinces retailers with its climate-neutral display.

(CET)

Building sustainable plastic-free brands
Lorenz von Seherr
Geschäftsführer
PlantBase GmbH
(Almost) anyone can sell natural cosmetics. Being truly sustainable and still developing innovative and helpful products, on the other hand, is not so easy. PlantBase has turned the cosmetics world upside down. The combination of innovative, plastic-free products and packaging and dealing with new digital challenges at the same time was the decisive success factor for PlantBase. Why it is becoming increasingly important to combine sustainable ideas with thoughtful strategic thinking?

(CET)

Get Onboard: Reduce. Reuse. Rethink
Jo Rowan
Associate Director - Strategy
PriestmanGoode

(CET)

Replacing Plastics in E-commerce Packaging: The Future of Sustainable Packaging Design
Tania Montesi
Global E-Commerce Manager
HB Fuller
As e-commerce embarks on its next wave of exponential growth, fulfillment centers and CPG brands are seeking to create sustainable, innovative packaging design to provide a competitive edge. In this 45-minute presentation, Tania Montesi H.B. Fuller Global E-Commerce Manager will share how H.B. Fuller breakthrough, patent-pending bio-based Sesame® Evolution™ tear tapes are causing e-tailers to re-imagine easy opening solutions for e-commerce packaging using plastic alternatives. -Understand why packaging components, including tapes and adhesive, are critical to thoughtful sustainable e-commerce packaging design -Discover how H.B. Fuller Sesame® Evolution™ PSA tear tapes support sustainable packaging goals by enhancing the unboxing experience, reducing plastic, while also adding more usable fiber to the recycling stream

(CET)

Eliminating plastic from consumer packaging
Thomas Marinelli
Head of Sustainable Design & Products
Signify
Signify actively strives for a reduction of the environmental impact of its products and has now started eliminating all plastics from packaging for consumer-related products with the aim to be plastic-free in 2021. In Q3 2020 the new plastic-free packaging for LED lamps launched in Europe, removing over 500 metric tonnes of plastic waste per year. In total, the move to plastic-free consumer packaging will avoid the use of over 2.5 million kilos of plastic annually. In this presentation, we will share our approach, successes and struggles to find alternative materials and packaging redesign.

3:20 pm (CET)

Adapting the supply and demand on rPET by rethinking and weight lighting of plastic bottles using an artificial intelligence platform
Dr Katharina Eissing
CEO
Digimind
With the commitment of major companies to a circular plastic economy the demand for rPET has doubled to be 1.1 billion pounds in 2021 while the actual production is just 333 million pounds. -There is a huge opportunity to redesign and reduce the weight of the packaging without affecting the performance thus addressing the rPET supply shortage - New technologies such as digital twin and AI are capable of solving this challenge

(CET)

Panel Discussion: FibreTech2.0 -Emulation of food-grade plastic packaging formats at scale
Michael Laermann
Managing Director
Reason & Rhyme
Volker Maier
Global Luxury Engineering Leader and Engineering Director
COTY,
Tahsin Dag
CEO
Papacks
Timo Porsch
CEO
Periplast
Panelists from three different industries (food, beauty, packaging) discuss their experience with fibre-basedmaterialsfrom secondary feedstock combined with organic barrier coatings and modern injection molding techniques to replace conventional plastic packagingby new formats that are recyclable, compostable, andcertified food-safe. Their showcase will feature the emulation of plastic transport trays, cosmetic cream jars, and coffee capsules made from aluminium

Day2: November 11, 2021

Achieving 100% of plastic packaging reusable, recyclable, or compostable
9:00 am - 12:30 pm

(CET)

New sustainable food contact materials & Global regulatory & compliance Challenges
Marco Scialpi
Food Contact Material Global Business Development Manager & FCM Senior Expert
TÜV International GmbH
Overview of international FCM legislation, TUVR product testing and DINCERTCO certification scheme requirements for sustainable products (bio-based, biodegradable, compostable and recyclable materials) and related migration safety challenges
 

(CET)

Sustainable packaging as a matter of willpower, not of legislation - Best practice of successful European retailers
Georg Raffael Spindler
Manager Speciality Applications & Analytics
Lenzing AG
Jürgen Eizinger
Vice President of Global Business Management Nonwovens
Lenzing
How Lenzing & PACKNATUR® joined forces to shake up the way we pack fresh fruits and vegetables, and how retailers have benefited from showing will to change. LENZING™ for Packaging surrounds food and other goods in naturally durable and biodegradable fibers that are of botanic origin and certified safe for food contact. Sustainably produced and fully compostable after use, LENZING™ cellulosic fibers are suitable for a varied range of packaging applications, from single-use botanic nets and reusable bags. In close cooperation with producers, Lenzing AG has developed environmentally sustainable single-use nets and reusable bags for fruits and vegetables made from LENZING™ Modal fibers of botanic origin and certified as compliant with recognized safety standards for food contact. Responsibly produced in line with Lenzing’s commitment to sustainability, these vibrantly colored nets are becoming increasingly popular as a compostable substitute for plastic bags and nets, which are derived from non-renewable sources and contribute to the pollution of the environment.
 

(CET)

The Future for Flexible Packaging / Eliminating Plastic Packaging Waste with Circular Solutions
Betül Türel Erbay
Sustainability & Business Development Director
Elif Packaging
Our packaging is part of the solution to future challenges. However, one of the biggest challenges for sustainability so far is the various processes of collecting and sorting the packaging waste and how to include them in the cycle in order to create a real circular economy,” The appreciated model for the global economy is changing and further developing from a linear into a circular economy. Therefore, the whole supply chain should be aligned with the standardization of recycling processes both nationally and internationally.
 

(CET)

Made with purpose, not plastic! Our story on how we achieved the successful creation of a mass-produced paper bottle that could effectively eliminate the need for single-use plastic bottles in the supply chain.
David MacDonald
Business Owner
Cullen Eco-Friendly Packaging
This presentation summarises the real-life manufacturing challenges and hurdles faced by our team during our journey to create a mass market paper bottle. We will discuss the application of new technology, and detail the various steps taken that resulted in an innovative, patent pending solution that will significantly reduce the need for single-use plastic bottles in the supply chain.
 

(CET)

There’s no single route to sustainability, it’s about finding the best one for our customers and the environment.
Graeme Smith
Head of Product Sustainability for Flexible Packaging and Engineered Materials
Mondi
Mondi’s customer-centric approach, EcoSolutions, supports customers to achieve their sustainability goals and commitments in a fact-based manner that benefits end-consumers and the planet. Mondi is uniquely positioned to provide customers with paper & packaging that is fit-for-purpose using paper where possible, plastic when useful. To ensure our products are sustainable by design, all our activities are based around three actions replace, reduce, recycle:
 

(CET)

Concerted Efforts in Unlocking Circularity
Peggy Sung
Global Marketing Communications & Business Intelligence
Trinseo (Hong Kong) Ltd
Proven Closed-loop Recycling Technologies for Food Packaging Plastic packaging materials and waste face increasingly stringent sustainability targets on a global basis. To realize the vision of a circular economy, chemical recycling plays a vital role in decreasing fossil resource depletion and plastic waste as a whole. The presentation will cover a chemical recycling technology, among others, to illustrate the infinite recyclability of polystyrene. It is a technology that unlocks circularity and helps sustain a truly sustainable future for food contact applications. Transition to a circular economy requires the concerted efforts of the whole value chain. And the styrenics value chain has a particularly large role because of such technology and the polystyrene’s unique properties.
 

(CET)

Panel Discussion: EPR as sustainable model to ensure proper treatment of plastic packaging
Joachim Quoden
Managing Director / Lawyer
EXPRA - Extended Producer Responsibility Alliance
The author will explain the principles of Extended Producer Responsible and respective EPR systems which are able to ensure the proper treatment of (plastic) packaging so that only few plastics are leaking into the environment by establishing and running sustainable and efficient collection, sorting and recycling systems with accompanying communication and awareness campaings seconded by anti litter initiatives and support for companies to design their packaging in a sustainable way, leading to drastically less landfill and litter. The principles will be demonstrated by best practices from the field, meaning work of various EPR systems in Europe and abroad. Message: EXPRA is an alliance of 27 EPR systems (working on a non prfit basis owned by the obliged industry) mainly for packaging in 25 countries in Europe, Turkey, Israel, Canada and Chile having an experience of up partly over 25 years.
 
Reuse ‘refill’ model - Reuse ‘return’ model
1:30 am - 2:45 pm

(CET)

Packaging & Circular economy. The IFCO RPCs case
Michael Pooley
CEO
IFCO SYSTEMS GmbH
There are examples of packaging that are made to be shared and reuse. IFCO is the leading company of Reusable Plastic Containers (RPCs) for fresh produce. We manage a pool of 314 mio RPCs for about 1,7 billion trips a year, since 1992. Our crates are made of one only material (PP5), and used between 30 and 120 times before repaired or granulated to create new IFCO RPCs so that nothing is wasted.

(CET)

The power of cooperation to achieve climate-neutral glass packaging
Vanessa Chesnot
Senior Product Policy Manager
FEVE
By 2050 the container glass industry aims to achieve a major revolution in the way glass is produced that is fit for a circular and climate neutral economy. We are proud to produce healthy, reusable and infinitely recyclable closed loop packaging. It is inert and always remains healthy and safe for food grade packaging no matter how many times it is recycled. But the container glass industry needs to address carbon emissions. The presentation will provide an opportunity to learn about concrete initiatives such as the Close the Glass Loop, The Furnace for the Future and the Glass Hallmark that the European Glass Packaging industry is putting in place to address sustainability and climate change, achieve a Circular Economy and discuss how partnerships across industrial value chains can help industry innovate and decarbonise.

Fashion & Textiles

Day1: November 10, 2021

Networking breakfast
8:15 am - 8:55 am (CET)
Keynote Session
9:00 am - 12:30 pm (CET)

(CET)

Circular innovation LAB
Martin Ekenbark
Project Manager - Circular Innovation LAB
H&M Group
In order to reach our goals of 100% recycled or other sustainably sourced materials by 2030 and climate positive in the complete value chain by 2040 the H&M group has initiated a circular innovation LAB that scout, support and evaluate innovations in their early (lab scale) to pre-industrial (pilot scale) stages of development. The Circular innovation LAB has now been up and running since 2019 and in this presentation, I’ll walk you through some of the projects performed and how we set up a collaborative eco-system together with innovators, start-ups, supply chain and our brands.
 

(CET)

Tackling microplastic in textiles and the circular economy action plan
Mauro Scalia
Director Sustainable Businesses
The European Apparel and Textile Confederation (EURATEX)
A rising global population will naturally consume more and more resources. Conscious and responsible purchases can make a difference yet there is also an urgent need to find and agree on new ways for making, using and disposing products, such as textiles. While the release of microplastics from textiles attracts policy and media concerns, the work of research and industry continues to measure, assess impact and explore feasible solutions.
 

(CET)

The Rise of Reusables: Understanding the Impact and Mapping the Path to Scale
Kathleen Rademan
Director Innovation Platform
Fashion for Good
This session will look at an overview of the different reusable systems and their potential within the fashion e-commerce sector. It will then dive into a nuanced impact analysis of reusable packaging versus a single-use packaging, accounting for key variables that may influence its impact - such as the return rate, type of single-use packaging used and distance travelled. Finally the discussion will be capped off with key recommendations and considerations for implementation, shaped by industry-specific case-study examples.
 
Designing circularity into the fashion and textiles sector
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm (CET)

(CET)

Addressing the challenge of plastic waste in the retail sector
Keith Charlton
Chief Operations Officer
Mainetti
For sixty years, Mainetti has brought innovation to hanging garments for the retail and fashion industries. We still believe that plastic has enormous potential in terms of sustainability, when it is used responsibly, and when accounting for the full product life cycle.

(CET)

Developments of biobased man-made fibres and textiles from available resources
Amrei Becker
Reseracher, Institut für Textiltechnik
RWTH Aachen University
The presentation will present research from the project BioBase. The goal of the BioBase project is to replace established petroleum based- with biobased polymers focusing on the textile industry. Introducing biobased alternatives that are equal in use and functionality, shall showcase their potential in the market. Research findings will be transferred to other products and industries. Part of the project is to examine the entire supply chain in order to uncover further research- and development opportunities.

(CET)

Re-Evolving our PYRATEX® fabrics
Pilar Tejada Lopez
Head of Brand & Communication
PYRATES smart fabrics
Re-Evolve: a closed-loop recycling program by PYRATES smart fabrics offered to our clients, giving old clothes new life. A 100% made in Spain process, RE-EVOLVE reflects a continuous evolution, a never-ending cycle.

(CET)

Circular Fashion Starts at the Beginning
Ruth Farrell
Global Marketing Director, Textiles
Eastman
From our clothes and eyeglasses to the water bottles we carry, the choices we make about how we present ourselves to the world says a lot about who we are and what we value. According to Eastman’s research what makes fashion sustainable has everything to do with what it’s made from. While a lot of the focus on making fashion more sustainable is on the end of life impacts (148 MT of waste per year by 2030), we must also “sustainable up” the inputs, using circular, sustainable materials to minimize the disastrous impacts of unsustainable farming, logging and extraction, pollution of waterways and countless tons of waste left in landfills. These inputs must also be durable to ensure longevity of the products they produce. And there is an emerging trend with consumers around ‘buy better’ which is very encouraging. Consumers are looking for sustainable, quality options, which is why quality is essential. Eastman, a specialty materials company focused on mainstreaming circularity, will host a panel discussion (to include a retailer and non-profit or NGO working on sustainable fashion) that will discuss:

(CET)

From linear to circular packaging materials in fashion - a fiber based material view
Tuomas Mustonen
Founder, CEO
Paptic Oy
The presentation will illustrate approaches to transition from linear to circular packaging materials, focusing on fashion industry applications. Presentation will focus on comparison of sustainability of several packaging application from materials perspective. Especial focus is placed on reusability and recyclability. Presentation will also highlight live customer examples of how Paptic material has replaced plastics with renewable, recyclable, reusable and biodegradable alternative.

(CET)

Panel Discussion: Biofabrication and sustainable materials in the apparel industry
Amanda Johnston
Curator & Education Consultant
Sustainable Angle
Kathleen Rademan
Director Innovation Platform
Fashion for Good

Day2: November 11, 2021

Utilising Waste as a Raw Material
9:00 am - 10:15 am (CET)

(CET)

Presentation title to be announced
Lotta Kopra
CCO
Spinnova
 

(CET)

Textiles out of tire waste - Chemcial Recycling as a platform to support the carbon circular economy
René Bethmann
Innovation Manager,
VAUDE Sport GmbH & Co. KG
The actual quality of recyclates is sometimes inferior compared to virgin material counterparts, which will challenge a design for durability and circularity. The durability as one of the most important criteria of the eco-design principles is often difficult to achieve. After a short review of previously implemented recycling technologies at VAUDE, the presentation will introduce the world´s first-of-its-kind textile products made with a novel molecular recycling process using waste tires and turning them into a virgin-grade Polyamide. It will be displayed how chemical recycling is beside other technology platforms contributor to the carbon circular economy. Speaker’s professional biography à René Bethmann graduated in Textile and Apparel Technology and has worked for several leading brands across Europe in the field of product and material management. Currently he´s working at VAUDE as Innovation Manager, managing innovation processes and related projects about material and joining technologies with strong focus on biopolymers and recycling strategies. Furthermore, since 2020 he is a consultant of the VAUDE Academy for Sustainable Management.
 

(CET)

Panel Discussion: Successes born from struggles
Dr. Ashley Holding
Principal Consultant and Scientist
Circular Material Solutions Ltd
Linus Mueller
IP/R&D Coordinator
Circular Systems
 
Reduction and Recovery of Microfiber Pollution
10:45 am - 12:30 pm (CET)

1:15 pm (CET)

Textile fragments as a source of microplastic in the environment
Maike Rabe
Professor
Hochschule Niederrhein
More than 75 % of the world fibre consumption is based synthetic fibres due to a very good price-performance ratio and great availability. Nevertheless the consequences for the environment such as fibrous microplastic have to considered. The presentation depicts FMP sources and the problem solving approach including textile constructions and biodegrable fibres.

(CET)

Wasser 3.0 PE-X® - first filter free removal of microplastics from various waters
Dr Katrin Schuhen
Inventor and CEO
Wasser 3.0 gGmbH
With Wasser 3.0 PE-X®, we demonstrate the world's first filter free low-tech process that removes microplastics from various waters: Procedurally very simple, cost-effective and low-maintenance. The removal process uses organosilanes and is based on an agglomeration fixation reaction. The clou is, that microplastic agglomerates float to the surface and an easy skimmer separation leads to a removal efficiency of reproducible > 95 %, independent of polymer type, pH and pollutant concentration.

(CET)

Panel Discussion: Microfiber reduction and recovery
Dr Katrin Schuhen
Inventor and CEO
Wasser 3.0 gGmbH
Textile-to-Textile Recycling Paving the Way to Circularity
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm (CET)

(CET)

Textile to textile recycling - pilot results
Rebecca Johansson
Sustainability and R&D Manager
Helly Hansen

(CET)

INTERREG RETEX, an experiment of the textile circular economy, results and perspectives
Jeanne Meillier
Chargé de développement
Euramaterials
INTERREG RETEX, a Franco-Belgian textile circular economy project, focuses on the recycling of used textiles and production offcuts in cotton, polyester or cotton/polyester blends. The project ran from October 2016 to March 2021. Budget of 1,610,780 euros / ERDF assistance of 885,929 euros Thanks to numerous workshops, INTERREG RETEX finalized 3 value chains with an analysis on the technical, economic and environmental levels. - Recycled hospital clothes to make new fabric for the same market. - Recycled cotton production scraps for the knitwear industry - Polyester scraps transformed by a thermomechanical process (plastics process) to make granules. Jeanne MEILLIER - leader of the INTERREG RETEX project - will present the results of the project as well as the locks and research perspectives to be anticipated beyond the project.

(CET)

Textile Jeopardy
Karla Magruder
CEO
Accelerating Circularity
Ask the audience to come up with the right question that would elicit the question. Audience will work in teams to answer the questions together. Part of providing the right question would be to define why these questions need to be asked, what difference they make and how they lead to action.

(CET)

Approaches of a sustainable circular economy for textile applications
Sascha Schriever
Head of Chemical Technologies for Textile and Fibre Innovations
ITA Technologietransfer GmbH - ITA Institute of RWTH Aachen
Today, plastic waste and its management is one of the most influential and discussed environmental topics. Appropriate waste treatment is an essential key for the preservation of entire ecosystems such as the sea.

(CET)

Blockchain Technology for textiles
Eduardo Garza
Director, Research & Development
Waste2Wear
Waste2Wear created the textile industry first, blockchain technology that verifies every step of the supply chain, ensuring all products are made in an environmentally friendly manner. All of the partners in our supply chain have the highest industry standards and have the necessary certifications to verify this. Blockchain technology provides digital records through tamper-proof, physical smart seals. Our blockchain records all the steps of the recycling supply chain (from plastic waste to product) in order to create a traceable record that secures the compliance of the materials throughout the manufacturing process.

(CET)

Chemical Recycling of PET Polyester
Jeroen Bulk
CFO
Ioniqa Technologies
Every year we produce over 320m tons of plastic of which only 10-20% is recycled. The main reason for this is that there is no viable solution for difficult to recycle plastics. Chemical recycling is THE solution to this problem. Ioniqa has developed a technology with which PET Polyester (25% of al plastics) can be recycled infinitely, at prices and quality competitive to oil based PET but with an up to 75% lower CO2 footprint. The proof is in our 10k ton per annum plant in The Netherlands which is operational.

(CET)

Panel Discussion: What do consumers want from sustainable fashion?
Ruth Farrell
Global Marketing Director, Textiles
Eastman
From our clothes and eyeglasses to the water bottles we carry, the choices we make about how we present ourselves to the world says a lot about who we are and what we value. According to Eastman’s research what makes fashion sustainable has everything to do with what it’s made from. While a lot of the focus on making fashion more sustainable is on the end of life impacts (148 MT of waste per year by 2030), we must also “sustainable up” the inputs, using circular, sustainable materials to minimize the disastrous impacts of unsustainable farming, logging and extraction, pollution of waterways and countless tons of waste left in landfills. These inputs must also be durable to ensure longevity of the products they produce. And there is an emerging trend with consumers around ‘buy better’ which is very encouraging. Consumers are looking for sustainable, quality options, which is why quality is essential. Eastman, a specialty materials company focused on mainstreaming circularity, will host a panel discussion (to include a retailer and non-profit or NGO working on sustainable fashion) that will discuss: • Today’s latest options on sustainable materials • Effective innovation approaches to working with those materials • How to most effectively communicate about sustainable materials to leverage the effort with today’s consumer • The infrastructure changes needed to accelerate the use of sustainable inputs to the fashion industry

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This