Track 01 | Agenda 2021 

Eliminating Plastic Waste

Day1: November 10, 2021

Networking breakfast
8:15 am - 8:55 am (CET)
Opening Plenary and Keynote Session
9:00 am - 12:30 pm (CET)

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Panel Discussion: Accelerating a circular plastics economy through partnerships
Kristin Hughes
Director of the Global Plastic Action Partnership and Member of the Executive Committee
World Economic Forum
The dramatic increase in global plastic waste and pollution has become one of the greatest environmental crises of our time, with around eight million tons of plastic waste leaking into the ocean every year. By assembling a diverse and influential coalition of allies dedicated to addressing this challenge, the Global Plastic Action Partnership (GPAP) has forged a powerful multi-stakeholder platform to accelerate impact at both the global and national levels. Kristin will reveal more about how GPAP is harnessing the convening power of the World Economic Forum to form impactful partnerships, create alignment among diverse initiatives, and guide an inclusive transition towards a circular economy for plastics.
 

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European plastic policies: state-of-play
Werner Bosmans
Directorate General Environment
European Commission
Challenges linked to the production, consumption and end-of-life of plastics can be turned into an opportunity for the European Union and the competitiveness of the European industry. Tackling them through an ambitious strategic vision, covering the entire value chain, can spur growth, jobs and innovation. It can also reaffirm European leadership in global solutions and help us make the transition towards a low-carbon and circular economy, while providing citizens with a cleaner, safer environment.
 

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The Basel Convention Amendment on Plastic Waste and its relevance to industry
Rolph Payet
Secretariat
Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions
During the Basel Conference of the Parties in April/May 2019, governments amended the Basel Convention to include plastic waste in a legally binding framework to make global trade in plastic waste more transparent and better regulated, while also ensuring that its management is safer for human health and the environment. At the same time, a new Partnership on Plastic Waste was established to mobilize business, government, academic and civil society resources, interests and expertise to assist in implementing the new measures, to provide a set of practical supports – including tools, best practices, technical and financial assistance. Dr Payet will reveal the latest in regard to the Basel Convention Plastic Waste Amendments.
 

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The Current State and Future of Plastic Taxes
Victor Bell
US Managing Director
Lorax EPI
There is a growing movement around the world to tax plastic packaging, whether it be to fill budget gaps left by COVID-19 or to bolster infrastructure for recycling. Plastic taxes have already been passed in many places, including the UK, Italy and the EU, and are being proposed around the globe at national and regional levels. Taxes are based on different policies in each country, such as recycled content or amounts recycled, and can have a major impact on cost of goods for many packaging systems. As part of our presentation, Lorax EPI will give examples of what these taxes may cost brand owners and provide a global update on current statuses of various plastic taxes under development.
 

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Panel discussion: Taxes, bans and producer responsibility - what is the right policy measure for improving plastic outcomes?
David Newman
Managing Director
BBIA
Robbie Staniforth
Head of Policy
Ecosurety
Victor Bell
US Managing Director
Lorax EPI
Berry Wiersum
Head of Regulatory Affairs
Sappi Europe
Werner Bosmans
Directorate General Environment
European Commission
 
Technologies & Solutions Directly Eliminating Plastic
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm (CET)

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It’s 2021 and what’s really going on? Joining the plastic dots to accelerate real change
Siân Sutherland
Co-Founder
A Plastic Planet
This presentation she will explore the connection of plastic to the climate crisis with a snapshot of plastic progress, innovations, health science, corporate risk and smokescreens.

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Smart Design for Sustainable and Circular Solutions
Jonathan Demierre
Team Section Lead - Circular and Sustainable Product Engineering
Helbling
How products and systems are designed is key to address sustainability challenges, such as climate change, plastic waste, loss of biodiversity, or resource depletion. Using life cycle thinking and a holistic approach is key to minimize the environmental impact of the products that we use every day. The design of sustainable products is a multi-criteria and multi-parameter optimization in which many aspects needs to be considered such as the targeted markets and consumers, the manufacturing process, and the product end-of-life. A few practical examples will illustrate how a sustainable and circular design approach can make the difference.

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Replacing synthetic fibres through open innovation and flexible technology: How we develop functional cellulose fibre solutions for high-performance applications
Ilka Kaczmarek
Innovation Manager
Kelheim Fibres GmbH
Our vision is to use our cellulosic fibres to enable the production of fully biodegradable solutions with performance comparable to products containing synthetic fibres. Fields of applications where the replacement of synthetic fibres can be achieved thanks to our innovative solutions include disposable Hygiene products (Femcare, Adultcare, Babycare, (flushable) wipes), functionalized textiles, reusable Hygiene Products (e.g. period panties).

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Technological options to make Plastics Circular
Dr Christian Haessler
SVP & Head of Circular Economy Program
Covestro
Christian will give a presentation on technolgical Options to make palstics circular. in thsi respect, the well established way of chemcia Recycling pkays an important role and the Technology Needs to be further developed, including the collecting, sorting and seperating of plastic waste so that the amount of mechnical recycled plastic can be increased.

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Sustainable Masterbatch Solutions for Plastic Converters
Omri Mazar
Product Manager
Tosaf Group
Tosaf has made it a priority to find more sustainable practices in Plastics Manufacturing. I would like to elaborate on four different segments and present solutions in each of the segments: • Recycle enablers – solutions that ease processing of recycled raw materials and improve it properties and performance. • Recyclable solutions – various high-performance additive and color solutions that do not compromise full recyclability. • Solutions for the biodegradable and bio-compostable polymer systems • Efficiency boosters – indirect solution to reduce overall raw material, energy, time, and labor demand.

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Panel Discussion: From “Plastic Oceans” to “Plastic Waste Free Oceans” by 2050! How can we get from the old crime story to a new reality?
Henrik Langholf
Zukunftsmoderator/Future Facilitator
Zukunftsmoderation
Marko Kärkkäinen
Chief Commercial Officer - Global
Clewat Inc.
The global movement for a smart use of (no) plastic is one of the most fascinating and successful happenings towards more sustainability. Where ever you go, consumers are reducing their plastic foot print, companies are developing material innovations, communities are optimizing their recycling systems, national and international networks are researching on new standards for the circular economy, governments are setting new frames through objectives and laws.

Day2: November 11, 2021

Multi-faceted Tools for Establishing Plastic's Footprint and Transparency of the Supply Chain
9:00 am - 12:30 pm (CET)

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Toolbox to evaluate the biodegradation of plastic materials in the open environment
Dr Miriam Weber
Managing director
HYDRA Marine Sciences GmbH
Biodegradable plastic materials are increasingly being discussed as an alternative for conventional non-biodegradable plastic and as a mitigation strategy against plastic pollution, especially for items with an intentional input (e.g. seed coating, etc.), with a high potential of loss (e.g. mulch film, etc.) and where loss is intrinsic to use (e.g. abrasion of aquaculture nets, textiles, tiers, etc.). The question for society is how to deal with biodegradable plastic known to end up in the open environment. We present options for biodegradation testing schemes showing several scenarios. They are based on the delicate balance of either high informative value and decreased costs.
 

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Giving new life to old mattresses
Lucie Porcelli
Sustainability Leader
Dow Europe GmbH
In Europe each year around 30 million mattresses are discarded and currently most of this bulky waste-stream (~60%) ends up in landfills, the remainder being incinerated to produce heat and electricity. At present, waste-to-energy is the preferred technology for the treatment of end-of-life polyurethane (PU) foam. However, incineration is a source of CO2 and a waste of valuable resources. Recycling PU foams and building a recycling supply chain poses unique challenges. Today, markets for products from mechanical recycling have been developed but are of low-value, while the market size is small and in decline. Therefore, alternative solutions for discarded mattresses, such as, chemical recycling and consequently creating a market for recovered raw materials (polyols) with recycled content, needed to be developed. To address this challenge, the award-winning RENUVA™ Mattress Recycling Program aims to reduce this mountain of waste by giving polyurethane (PU) foam from end-of-life mattresses a new life. The program will take discarded mattress foam and turn it back into raw material (polyols) through chemical recycling, the process of converting waste into feedstock. The new raw material will then be used in flexible or rigid foam products to go into applications such as building insulation boards and even new mattresses. While converting PU foams to polyols is not new, it has never been implemented for post-consumer waste bringing new technology challenges and complexity of collection and dismantling. At Dow, we believe our materials need to be as valuable at the end of their life as they are at the start—and we're addressing the challenge of discarded mattresses head-on. To tackle the problems of mattress waste, we needed to create a way to close the loop on the polyurethane foams they're made with. While converting PU foams to polyols is not new, it has never been implemented for post-consumer waste bringing new technology challenges and complexity of collection and dismantling. For example, in most countries, there is an absence of adequate waste collection facilities that prevents any stable sourcing for chemical recycling. And, the downstream market for such polyols is limited. In order to drive significant market impact, Dow adopted a ‘collaboration approach’ with industry partners across the value chain. From the cooperation in 2017 with equipment producer and processing specialist H&S Anlagentechnik, to selecting the plant operator – Orrion Chemicals Orgaform in May 2020 in France, Dow has been actively seeking out key partnerships to pioneer a model of true circularity for recycled polyols. These efforts were further strengthened by Dow joining forces with French EPR (Extended Producer Responsibility) firm, Eco-mobilier, for supply of polyurethane foam from post-consumer mattresses to the recycling unit. In October 2020, Dow took one step further in this journey by announcing a collaboration with the Vita Group, Europe’s leading flexible polyurethane foam solutions provider, to produce flexible polyurethane (PU) foams made with RENUVA™ polyols. And it is expected that before the Plastic Free World Conference, more collaborations will be announced. We would like to discuss during the next Plastic Free World Conference about HOW Dow and its partners are making mattress recycling a reality. This is not a concept, idea or lab-scale operation. This is a reality. During the talk, we would offer to have a unique look into the plant construction in Semoy, France, which at capacity, will recycle PU foam of up to 200,000 mattresses annually. Unlike the incineration process currently used, the RENUVA™ polyols produced from waste mattresses will have approximately 30% lower carbon footprint compare to a virgin polyol produced, according to a preliminary internal Life Cycle Assessment. As such, landfills are reduced, incineration avoided, the carbon footprint of the industry is improved, and business value is generated. The plant construction is currently underway and is expected to be operational during 2nd half of 2021. And, we consider the RENUVA™ Mattress Recycling Program to just be the beginning. By demonstrating that polyurethanes can be recycled when the right eco-system exists, we hope to stimulate the entire PU industry and create more demand for a process that could then be extended to other markets.
 

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Digimarc Barcode on plastic packaging solution creates societal value - we have calculated it
Caterina Camerani
Vice President Sustainability
PACCOR Group
The Digimarc Barcode innovation, introduced on the surface of plastic packaging by PACCOR, enables the correct identification of each package throughout the value chain to consumers and disposal companies, allowing for a proper recover of the material.
 

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Underpinning ESG claims with traceability
Douglas Johnson-Poensgen
Founder & CEO
Circulor
 

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Moving towards sustainable and transparent supply chains through certification
Hanna Buck
Program Manager & Sustainability Expert
Control Union
Is your business taking responsibility for its plastics impact? Do you have a robust process in place to back up your claims around plastics? With pressure to reduce plastic usage coming from both consumers and governments, a certification against a trusted plastics standard is of great value to businesses. Now more than ever companies need to prove the ways in which they are recycling, cutting the use of plastic and adopting alternative, compostable, materials through a credible certification process. This presentation will give an insight into which plastic-related certifications are available, the benefits of having a certification and basic procedures of certifications to move towards more sustainable and transparent supply chains.
 

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PANEL DISCUSSION: SEALIVE (Strategies of circular Economy and Advanced bio-based solutions to keep our Lands and seas alIVE from plastics contamination)
Miriam Gallur
Materials and Packaging Area Manager at ITENE
ITENE
Decoupling plastic production from fossil feed-stock and creating a circular plastics economy are essential to achieving European Union climate, energy and sustainability goals. Approximately 12 million tons of plastic waste ends up in our oceans and contaminates our land every year. While there has been a recent shift toward the use of bio-based plastics, these materials have limitations and are not easy to recycle using current technologies. SEALIVE will address all these challenges with a vision to to reduce plastic waste and contamination on land and in seas by boosting the use of biomaterials and contributing to the circular economy with cohesive bio-plastic strategies.
 
End-of-life Options for Plastic and Valorising Waste
1:30 am - 5:00 pm (CET)

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Innovative financing mechanisms: Plastic credits for inclusive & transparent circularity
Christina Jäger
Co-founder & Managing Director
Yunus Environment Hub
Daniela Albuquerque
Marketing Coordinator
BVRio
There is a growing movement towards increasing plastic recycling rates, in particular by consumer goods companies who are facing intense pressure to reduce the environmental impact of their waste packaging. A variety of measures are being explored, including reduction of packaging, increasing recycled and recyclable content of packaging, the use of biodegradable material, packaging returning schemes, etc.

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The Circularity entire circularity solution of PET
Christian Crépet
Executive Director
PETCORE Europe
Presentation Description: 1-PET is safe and sound 2- Refill at home, on the go and through bottle crates recognition within a RDS. 3- Re-use through compaction with RVM ( reverse vending machines) through a RDS. 4- Mechanical Recycling 5- Chemical recycling by depolymerization. 6- CO2 performances.

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Plastic Bank Recycling Ecosystems, powered by Blockchain
Shaun Frankson
Co-Founder and Chief Technology Officer
Plastic Bank
Plastic Bank® empowers the regenerative society. We are helping the world stop ocean plastic while improving the lives of collector communities. Plastic Bank builds ethical recycling ecosystems in coastal communities and reprocesses the materials for reintroduction into the global manufacturing supply chain. Collectors receive a premium for the materials they collect which helps them provide basic family necessities such as groceries, cooking fuel, school tuition, and health insurance. Plastic Bank’s certified blockchain platform secures the entire transaction and provides real-time data visualization – allowing for transparency, traceability, and rapid scalability. The collected material is reborn as Social Plastic® which can be easily reintegrated into products and packaging as part of a closed-loop supply chain. Plastic Bank currently operates in Haiti, Brazil, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Egypt. The Plastic Bank blockchain platform ensures a complete audit trail of every transaction and exchange - from the initial point of collection through to the reintroduction of Social Plastic® product on the retail shelf. Our proprietary platform secures transactions and provides real-time data visualization - allowing for transparency, traceability, and rapid scalability at every step of the closed-loop supply chain. The Plastic Bank App maintains all operations from a global standpoint. Developed with IBM, the Plastic Bank App utilizes blockchain technology to ensure all plastic is ethically collected, reprocessed by partner processors, and sold to Plastic Bank partner clients. For the collector, the App provides a fair, reliable and transparent payment system while validating the identity of all members. For our partners, the App ensures a complete audit trail of every transaction and exchange - from the initial point of collection through to the reintroduction of Social Plastic® product on the retail shelf. Using the blockchain technology, Plastic Bank offers real-time data visualization and dashboards. With over 100,000 transactions processed, the Plastic Bank App offers access to a secure supply chain of recycled Social Plastic® feedstock, while storing authentic impact data and demonstrating environmental, social, and economic impact for brand partners. Plastic Bank’s breakthrough, closed-loop recycling model allows the company to rapidly scale and enter new geographies. Recycling ecosystems are vertically integrated, ensuring that all stakeholders benefit at every step in the supply value chain. By working with local collection branches and processing partners, Plastic Bank is able to quickly gain the trust of communities and seamlessly establish operations that directly impact the lives of collectors and their families. Plastic Bank collectors receive premiums for the materials they collect. When collectors deposit plastic waste, their digital ID is scanned, Plastic is sorted and weighed by material and colour, and then collectors receive market price for plastic and premiums that are automatically deposited into their digital bank account. This helps over 22,000 collectors worldwide provide basic family necessities such as groceries, cooking fuel, school tuition, and health insurance. The material collected in Plastic Bank’s closed-loop recycling ecosystems are reprocessed and reborn as Social Plastic® to be reintroduced into the supply chain for the creation of new products and packaging materials. Global brand partners including Henkel, SC Johnson, Advansa, Carton Pack, and Hugo Boss. By integrating Social Plastic® back into the supply chain, these brands are building a regenerative plastic economy that is stopping ocean plastic and improving the lives of collector communities. Social Plastic® is regenerating ocean-bound plastic into environmental, social, and economic impact.

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Plastic waste into pure products - the next generation of chemical recycling
Daria Frączak
R&D Manager
Clariter
Awareness of the global plastic waste issue has grown in recent years resulting in many regulatory and voluntary initiatives. The COVID-19 pandemic showed the importance of polymers as valuable materials that are very hard to substitute. Chemical recycling is a plastic waste treatment process complementary to mechanical recycling. Clariter offers this next generation, unique and complex technology that transforms plastic waste into high-quality, pure and ready-to-market products that are not blended with petrochemical streams, so come 100% from recycling. Clariter’s aliphatic solvents, white oils and paraffin waxes fulfil the highest industry standards and can be used directly in many applications.

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Increasing the uptake of recycled materials by businesses - A review of barriers, enablers and circular business models
Malou van der Vegt
Researcher and lecturer circular economy
University of Applied Sciences Utrecht
The presentation will cover the various barriers and enablers for recycling (for the total plastic industry and all types of products). The aim is to provide practical insights into the current situation in industry and to provide an overview of the barriers and enablers for the uptake of recycled plastics by businesses and other actors along the value chain. Findings are based on the outcomes from several workshops done in the Netherlands, Germany, of the United Kingdom and Belgium, as part of the Interreg project TRANSFORM-CE. Throughout the presentation, practical examples of circular business models will be given, with lots of inspiration to stimulate the uptake of recycling by businesses. Such examples will have a direct link to the outlined barriers and enablers. In summary, the barriers and enablers for recycling and the practical examples from industry will allow others to determine the steps that are needed to increase the uptake of recycled materials by businesses.

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Connecting the dots: How Circularity of Plastics will get us to Climate Neutrality
Tara Nitz
Global Positioning & Advocacy Circular Economy
Covestro
The aim to become Fully Circular at Covestro is closely interlinked with the Goal set also by the Paris Agreement, the European Union and in many more jurisdictions to become climate neutral. Circularity is playing an indispensible role to reach this Goal. The more we circulate carbon in products through a Circular Economy, mechanical and chemical Recycling and the use of alternative raw materails instead of fossil raw materials, the more emissions we avoid and by closing the carbon Loop are getting closer to climate neutrality. Making pastics circular reduces not only the Plastics footprint but also the scope 3 footprint of end and consumer products, therby contributing to climate neutrality throughout the value cycle. I will aim to contribute to the discussion by highlighting those connections and the preferred policy options to build a climate-neutral CE for Plastics.

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Panel Discussion: Innovative financing mechanisms: Plastic credits for inclusive & transparent circularity
Christina Jäger
Co-founder & Managing Director
Yunus Environment Hub
Daniela Albuquerque
Marketing Coordinator
BVRio
There is a growing movement towards increasing plastic recycling rates, in particular by consumer goods companies who are facing intense pressure to reduce the environmental impact of their waste packaging. A variety of measures are being explored, including reduction of packaging, increasing recycled and recyclable content of packaging, the use of biodegradable material, packaging returning schemes, etc.

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