Track 03 | Agenda 2021 

Fashion & Textiles

Day1: November 10, 2021

Networking breakfast
8:15 am - 8:55 am (CET)
Keynote Session
9:00 am - 12:30 pm (CET)

(CET)

Circular innovation LAB
Martin Ekenbark
Project Manager - Circular Innovation LAB
H&M Group
To reach our goals of 100% recycled or other sustainably sourced materials by 2030 and to be climate positive in the complete value chain by 2040, the H&M group has initiated a Circular Innovation Lab that scouts, supports and evaluates innovations in their early (lab scale) to pre-industrial (pilot scale) stages of development. The Circular Innovation Lab has been up and running since 2019. This presentation will walk you through some of the projects undertaken and how we set up a collaborative ecosystem together with innovators, startups, the supply chain and our brands.
 

(CET)

Tackling microplastic in textiles and the circular economy action plan
Mauro Scalia
Director Sustainable Businesses
The European Apparel and Textile Confederation (EURATEX)
A rising global population will naturally consume more and more resources. Conscious and responsible purchases can make a difference yet there is also an urgent need to find and agree on new ways for making, using and disposing products, such as textiles. While the release of microplastics from textiles attracts policy and media concerns, the work of research and industry continues to measure, assess impact and explore feasible solutions.
 

(CET)

The Rise of Reusables: Understanding the Impact and Mapping the Path to Scale
Kathleen Rademan
Director Innovation Platform
Fashion for Good
This session will give an overview of the different reusable systems and their potential within the fashion e-commerce sector. It will then dive into a nuanced impact analysis of reusable packaging versus single-use packaging, accounting for key variables that may influence its impact, such as the return rate, type of single-use packaging used and distance traveled. The discussion will be capped off by key recommendations and considerations for implementation, shaped by industry-specific case-study examples.
 
Designing circularity into the fashion and textiles sector
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm (CET)

(CET)

What do consumers want?
Kirsi Seppäläinen
VP, Strategic projects
Stora Enso

(CET)

Addressing the challenge of plastic waste in the retail sector
Keith Charlton
Chief Operations Officer
Mainetti
For 60 years, Mainetti has brought innovation to hanging garments for the retail and fashion industries. We still believe that plastic has enormous potential in terms of sustainability, when it is used responsibly and when accounting for the full product lifecycle. Our discussion will center on new ways of addressing challenges relating to plastic waste in the retail sector. We will share how our spirit of innovation led to advancements in our packaging, branding and supply chain solutions for the fashion industry. We will focus on the following topics: Mainetti’s global closed-loop reuse solutions for our product ranges, including hangers and EAS made from traditional and new sustainable materials like UBQ’s patented thermoplastic; Mainetti’s cutting-edge, recycled paper hanger and the technology that went into developing it. This is a product that is unique in our industry and presents retailers and brand owners with a viable, sustainable paper alternative to plastic; M-Film Polyloop is Mainetti’s new closed-loop recycling system that finally addresses the single-use polybag dilemma.

(CET)

Developments of biobased man-made fibres and textiles from available resources
Amrei Becker
Reseracher, Institut für Textiltechnik
RWTH Aachen University
The aim of the BioBase project is to establish bio-based polymers in the textile industry and to demonstrate their full potential. In order to achieve this goal, the four key sectors of the textile industry in Germany were selected: automotive, sportswear, interiors and technical textiles. In each sector, a petroleum-based product is replaced by a product made of biopolymers that has equivalent properties. The research approach in this project can be transferred to other textile sectors. The Institut für Textiltechnik of RWTH Aachen University is researching this topic in cooperation with ten industry and research partners. More information can be found here: https://www.biotexfuture.de/.

(CET)

Re-Evolving our PYRATEX® fabrics
Pilar Tejada Lopez
Head of Brand & Communication
PYRATES smart fabrics
Re-Evolve: a closed-loop recycling program by Pyrates smart fabrics, offered to our clients and giving old clothes new life. A 100% made in Spain process, Re-Evolve reflects a continuous evolution, a never-ending cycle. Your Pyratex upcycled garment will have a composition label with a small opaque square. This square will slowly fade throughout the washing process and, at the end of the garment’s lifecycle, a QR code will be revealed. When your QR code has appeared, your garment is ready to be recycled. Scan the QR code with your phone, which will take you to a landing page letting you know how your specific garment must be recycled. The brand will send Pyrates your garment, which will be collected at the company’s warehouse in Madrid. The cotton recycling process will then be carried out by Pyrates’ Spanish partner – a company specialized in recycling textile waste into premium recycled fibers, and a pioneer of sustainable materials and recycling since 1947. The recycling process will be mainly mechanical. It starts with a cleaning and classification process, removing buttons and zippers and classifying the clothing by color. After this, the items will undergo a shredding process during which they are transformed into shorter cotton fibers. These cotton fibers are then prepared to be spun into yarn within the same facility. The fibers will be spun into new Pyratex upcycled yarn. A new Pyratex upcycled textile will be created with this yarn, starting the process all over again.

(CET)

Circular Fashion Starts at the Beginning
Ruth Farrell
Global Marketing Director, Textiles
Eastman
From our clothes and eyeglasses to the water bottles we carry, the choices we make about how we present ourselves to the world say a lot about who we are and what we value. According to Eastman’s research, what makes fashion sustainable has everything to do with what it’s made from. While a lot of the focus on making fashion more sustainable is on the end-of-life impacts (148 MT of waste per year by 2030), we must also ‘sustainable up’ the inputs, using circular, sustainable materials to minimize the disastrous impacts of unsustainable farming, logging and extraction, pollution of waterways and countless tons of waste left in landfills. These inputs must also be durable to ensure the longevity of the products they produce. Furthermore, there is an emerging trend with consumers around ‘buy better’, which is very encouraging. Consumers are looking for sustainable, high-quality options. Eastman, a specialty materials company focused on mainstreaming circularity, will host a panel discussion (to include a retailer and non-profit or NGO working on sustainable fashion) that will discuss today’s latest options for sustainable materials, effective innovation approaches to working with those materials, how to most effectively communicate about sustainable materials to leverage the effort with today’s consumer, and the infrastructure changes needed to accelerate the use of sustainable inputs to the fashion industry.

(CET)

From linear to circular packaging materials in fashion - a fiber based material view
Tuomas Mustonen
Founder, CEO
Paptic Oy
The presentation will illustrate approaches to transition from linear to circular packaging materials, focusing on fashion industry applications. It will focus on a comparison between the sustainability of several packaging applications from a materials perspective. A particular focus will be reusability and recyclability. The presentation will also highlight live customer examples of how Paptic material has replaced plastics with a renewable, recyclable, reusable and biodegradable alternative.

(CET)

Panel Discussion: Biofabrication and sustainable materials in the apparel industry
Amanda Johnston
Curator & Education Consultant
Sustainable Angle
Kathleen Rademan
Director Innovation Platform
Fashion for Good

Day2: November 11, 2021

Utilising Waste as a Raw Material
9:00 am - 10:15 am (CET)

(CET)

Wood and waste to textiles, using zero hazardous chemicals and 99% less water than cotton
Lotta Kopra
CCO
Spinnova
 

(CET)

Textiles out of tire waste - Chemcial Recycling as a platform to support the carbon circular economy
René Bethmann
Innovation Manager,
VAUDE Sport GmbH & Co. KG
The quality of recyclates is sometimes inferior to virgin material counterparts, which will challenge a design for durability and circularity. Durability is one of the most important criteria in eco-design principles but is often difficult to achieve. After a short review of previously implemented recycling technologies at Vaude, the presentation will introduce the world’s first-of-their-kind textile products made with a novel molecular recycling process using waste tires and turning them into a virgin-grade polyamide. It will explain how chemical recycling contributes to the carbon circular economy.
 

(CET)

Panel Discussion: Successes born from struggles
Dr. Ashley Holding
Principal Consultant and Scientist
Circular Material Solutions Ltd
Linus Mueller
IP/R&D Coordinator
Circular Systems
 
Reduction and Recovery of Microfiber Pollution
10:45 am - 12:30 pm (CET)

1:15 pm (CET)

Textile fragments as a source of microplastic in the environment
Maike Rabe
Professor
Hochschule Niederrhein
More than 75% of the world’s fiber consumption is based on synthetic fibers due to their very good price-performance ratio and great availability. Nevertheless, the consequences for the environment – such as fibrous microplastic – must be considered. The presentation discusses FMP sources and a problem-solving approach including textile constructions and biodegradable fibers.

(CET)

Wasser 3.0 PE-X® - first filter free removal of microplastics from various waters
Dr Katrin Schuhen
Inventor and CEO
Wasser 3.0 gGmbH
With Wasser 3.0 PE-X, we demonstrate the world’s first filter-free, low-tech process that removes microplastics from various waters: procedurally very simple, cost-effective and low maintenance. The removal process uses organosilanes and is based on an agglomeration fixation reaction. Microplastic agglomerates float to the surface and an easy skimmer separation leads to a removal efficiency of reproducible > 95 %, independent of polymer type, pH and pollutant concentration.

(CET)

Panel Discussion: Microfiber reduction and recovery
Dr Katrin Schuhen
Inventor and CEO
Wasser 3.0 gGmbH
Textile-to-Textile Recycling Paving the Way to Circularity
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm (CET)

(CET)

Textile to textile recycling - pilot results
Rebecca Johansson
Sustainability and R&D Manager
Helly Hansen

(CET)

INTERREG RETEX, an experiment of the textile circular economy, results and perspectives
Jeanne Meillier
Chargé de développement
Euramaterials
INTERREG RETEX, a Franco-Belgian textile circular economy project, focused on the recycling of used textiles and production offcuts in cotton, polyester or cotton/polyester blends. The project ran from October 2016 to March 2021 with a budget of €1,610,780 and ERDF assistance of €885,929. After numerous workshops, INTERREG RETEX finalized three value chains with an analysis on the technical, economic and environmental levels: recycled hospital clothes to make new fabric for the same market; recycled cotton production scraps for the knitwear industry; polyester scraps transformed by a thermomechanical process (plastics process) to make granules. The presentation will outline the results of the project as well as the locks and research perspectives to be anticipated in the future.

(CET)

Textile Jeopardy
Karla Magruder
CEO
Accelerating Circularity
In Textile Jeopardy we will ask the audience to come up with the right question that would elicit a specific answer. The audience will work in teams to answer the questions together. Part of providing the right question would be to define why these questions need to be asked, what difference they make and how they lead to action. There will be two game segments: chemical recycler and tracing technology. The game will demonstrate how important it is to formulate the right questions when learning about circular systems.

(CET)

Approaches of a sustainable circular economy for textile applications
Sascha Schriever
Head of Chemical Technologies for Textile and Fibre Innovations
ITA Technologietransfer GmbH - ITA Institute of RWTH Aachen
Plastic waste and its management is one of the most influential and discussed environmental topics. Appropriate waste treatment is an essential key to the preservation of entire ecosystems such as the sea. In recent decades, the production volume of man-made fibers has risen to more than 100 mio.t per year in 2019 and is currently growing at 4% per year. Due to this rapid market growth, the necessity of recycling textiles and using biobased sustainable materials is climbing year by year. This presentation will give you an insight into the textile world, current challenges and possible solutions for a sustainable and responsible textile industry. It will include current studies and research projects from the textile industry as well as our vision of the sustainable future of textiles.

(CET)

Blockchain Technology for textiles
Eduardo Garza
Director, Research & Development
Waste2Wear
Waste2Wear created a textile industry first: blockchain technology that verifies every step of the supply chain, ensuring all products are made in an environmentally friendly manner. All of the partners in our supply chain have the highest industry standards and the necessary certifications to verify this. Blockchain technology provides digital records through tamper-proof, physical smart seals. Our blockchain records all the steps of the recycling supply chain (from plastic waste to product) to create a traceable record that secures the compliance of the materials throughout the manufacturing process.

(CET)

Chemical Recycling of PET Polyester
Jeroen Bulk
CFO
Ioniqa Technologies
Every year we produce over 320 million tons of plastic, of which only 10-20% is recycled. The main reason for this is that there is no viable solution for difficult-to-recycle plastics. Chemical recycling is the solution to this problem. Ioniqa has developed a technology with which PET polyester (25% of all plastics) can be recycled infinitely, at prices and quality competitive with oil-based PET but with an up to 75% lower CO2 footprint. The proof is in our 10,000 ton per annum plant in the Netherlands, which is operational.

(CET)

Panel Discussion: What do consumers want from sustainable fashion?
Ruth Farrell
Global Marketing Director, Textiles
Eastman
From our clothes and eyeglasses to the water bottles we carry, the choices we make about how we present ourselves to the world say a lot about who we are and what we value. According to Eastman’s research, what makes fashion sustainable has everything to do with what it’s made from. While a lot of the focus on making fashion more sustainable is on the end-of-life impacts (148 MT of waste per year by 2030), we must also ‘sustainable up’ the inputs, using circular, sustainable materials to minimize the disastrous impacts of unsustainable farming, logging and extraction, pollution of waterways and countless tons of waste left in landfills. These inputs must also be durable to ensure the longevity of the products they produce. Furthermore, there is an emerging trend with consumers around ‘buy better’, which is very encouraging. Consumers are looking for sustainable, high-quality options. Eastman, a specialty materials company focused on mainstreaming circularity, will host a panel discussion (to include a retailer and non-profit or NGO working on sustainable fashion) that will discuss today’s latest options for sustainable materials, effective innovation approaches to working with those materials, how to most effectively communicate about sustainable materials to leverage the effort with today’s consumer, and the infrastructure changes needed to accelerate the use of sustainable inputs to the fashion industry.

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